© 2019 by Alpha Granite Austin

Natural Stone

Quarried from the Earth, the varieties of natural stone are beautifully unique. With materials that are suited for different applications. Explore the versatility of Marble, Granite and Quartzite.

Marble

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Marble with its inherent warmth, adds a sophisticated element to the area in which it is installed. Its naturally random appearance and engineering characteristics makes it a premium choice for floors, wall claddings, table tops, wainscot, floors, and vanity tops. Many marbles are well suited for wet area application, which extends the versatility of this material to include tub decks and showers.

Granite

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Granite is a long-time favorite for use as countertops in Kitchen, bathrooms, fireplaces as well as exterior cladding and pavement material. Its inherent strength, abrasion resistance and superior weathering durability are sure to keep it as one of the preeminent material selections available to today's architects.


Available in a striking array of colors, granite's durability, longevity, and economy make it ideal for kitchen countertops and other heavily used surfaces, including table tops and floors. It provides excellent scratch resistance since the hardness of the minerals in most granites is stronger than the utensils used on it.


Granite is generally heat resistant up to temperatures of ±250°C (±480°F). It’s also superior to the majority of common countertop surfaces in its resistance to bacteria retention. (Ref: MIA Technical Bulletins). The available pore volume capable of harboring a staining agent also makes granite relatively stain-resistant, with impregnating repellents sometimes used to reduce the chance of stains.

Quartzite

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Quartzite is a metamorphic rock made almost entirely of the mineral quartz. Quartzite begins its geologic life as sand grains, perhaps on a beach, desert dune, or riverbed. Over time, the sand grains become compressed and stuck together to form sandstone. If the sandstone gets buried ever more deeply underneath layers of rocks, it gets hotter and more compressed. With enough heat and pressure, the sand grains lose their original shape and fuse to their neighbors, forming a dense, durable rock.


One of the appeals of quartzite is its hardness and durability, and the other is that quartzite does not etch from acids like lemon juice or vinegar. If a rock labeled as quartzite becomes etched from acid, then it is mislabeled. Marble and dolomitic marble, on the other hand, will etch from these acids. Dolomitic marble etches slightly more slowly than regular marble. A true quartzite will not etch at all from normal kitchen acids.

 

IT IS IMPORTANT TO NOTE THAT THERE ARE QUARTZITES THAT CONTAIN DOLOMITE AND MARBLE, THEREFORE THOSE mislabeled QUARTZITES  WILL ETCH WHEN EXPOSED TO ACIDIC LIQUIDS.